Friday, October 3, 2014

DJ's Introduction


I would like to take a moment to formerly introduce myself to the PCE community. My name is D.J. Hueneman and I am honored to join such a dedicated staff here at PCE.  I am proud to say that I was born and raised in Cincinnati and attended Elder High School. I went on to earn degrees in Secondary Education and Paramedical Sciences at the University of Cincinnati. I currently hold an Ohio teaching license and Ohio paramedic certification. I enjoy speaking with young people about God and have had the privilege of leading several retreats. This has been an exceptionally exciting start to the school year as my wife and I await the birth of our first child.

The call to ministry came later in my life after pursuing several other careers. I have worked as a paramedic, firefighter, and science teacher for several years before arriving at Pregnancy Center East. My previous job experiences gave me a direct look at lives devastated by poverty and broken homes. I’ve noticed that many young people have a distorted view of love, and there are few options offering God’s view of love.  I am excited for the opportunities I will have to spread the word of God to young people with PCE. Kelly and I had an amazing opportunity to speak to 147 High School students about True Love and the Dangers of Pornography at the beginning of the school year. This was a unique assembly style talk we hope to continue in addition to our In Control and Theology of the Body classes. Kelly and I continue to work hard finding new and exciting ways to reach our students.

Chloe's Introduction


My name is Chloe Morrill and I am happy to introduce myself as Pregnancy Center East’s newest Chastity Educator. I hail from a little town named Fruitland, Missouri, which is located an hour and a half south of Saint Louis. I earned bachelor degrees in Theology and Catechetics from Franciscan University of Steubenville. Most of my family lives in Missouri, but as my mom says, “Although Cincinnati is far from Missouri, you will love working in the pro-life movement.”

I was involved with the middle school and women’s ministries at Franciscan University, which deepened my understanding and love for the dignity of the human person. I have been blessed to speak with women, men, and teens about the truth of their respective identities as sons and daughters of God. I have walked with many as their lives have been transformed by the Lord. These moments took my breath away and gave me a desire to work in a faith filled environment upon graduation. I hoped to work in a ministry that upholds this dignity and fights on the front lines of the pro-life movement.

You can imagine my delight when I discovered Pregnancy Center East! During the summer I helped teach the Theology of the Body for Teens summer classes while training to present our chastity programming in 22 elementary schools, 4 high schools, and 7 parishes here in my new home, the beautiful city of Cincinnati. I look forward to the opportunity to tell many more young people how wonderfully they have been made in His image and help them discover the beauty of the Catholic faith through Chastity Education.

So far, this journey has been an adventure of humble growth. I have two degrees and a little experience under my belt, but I am so excited about all the things I am going to learn as we continue through the school year. I have big shoes to fill, and the opportunity is a great honor. I am diving in with all that I am to serve the Lord and the members of the Pregnancy Center East family. Please pray for me!

Monday, December 10, 2012

Choosing the Rite Outfit


Until about 4 years ago, I usually wore jeans and a hoodie/sweater to Sunday Mass. After all, jeans were nicer than my usual soccer shorts or sweatpants, and I was comfortable in that. I figured that the point was not what I wore to Sunday Mass, but rather that I was there every week, participating fully, actively, and consciously. My parish seemed to be on my page, wardrobe-wise. Some people dressed up, but most people dressed casually, and it wasn't uncommon for some kid to show up in his or her full soccer uniform, right down to the cleats. "Come as you are," was my policy and that seemed sufficient.

Junior year of college, I transferred to a school where everyone dressed up for Sunday Mass. Girls wore skirts, dresses, heels, cardigans, and jewelry. Boys wore dress pants and collared shirts. A guy in a tie and blazer would be much more on the bandwagon than a guy in a tee shirt. It was different than what I was used to.

It made me think, though. Which is better? "Come as you are" or "Bring your best to God"?

Both.

...Kind of. I thought a lot about appropriate Sunday Mass wardrobe and here's what I've got. There are pretty much 3 basic questions I ask:

Is it modest?
This is the most basic one. If my clothes invite anyone to lust, then it's not appropriate to wear anywhere, including Mass. Disqualifications include skin tight, too short, featuring cleavage, or words on the butt.

Does it reflect the importance of the event?
When people do or attend something important, we dress up. Think of an audience with the Pope, a graduation, a wedding, meeting the President. The most important day in the liturgical calendar is Easter Sunday, and we've always dressed accordingly. Every Sunday, year round, is a "little Easter." Sundays are not counted in the 40 days of Lent because we are celebrating the Resurrection. Every Sunday is a re-celebration of Easter Sunday. That's a big deal, so I wear something nicer than I would wear if I were going to the mall or a friend's house.

Is it reverent?
What the heck is a humeral veil, you ask? It's the cloth over Pope Benedict XVI's hands in this picture.
What the heck is a humeral veil, you ask? It's the cloth over Pope Benedict XVI's hands in this picture.
Mary, Jesus' Mother, always magnifies the Lord and leads us to him. John the Baptist announces and prepares the way for Jesus' ministry on earth: "He [Jesus] must increase; I must decrease." Did you ever wonder why priests wear a humeral veil during Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament? Part of the reason priests wear that when they handle a monstrance that holds Jesus' Precious Body, is to draw attention to the Eucharistic Lord and away from themselves. We are all called to direct everyone's attention to Jesus, and what we wear speaks even when we're silent. If my clothes will encourage anyone to look more at me than at him, I won't wear it to Mass.

The end result is that I wear a dress or skirt (sometimes dress pants/dress shirt) Sunday Mass. Cardigans are key. My shoes are a little more casual: usually Toms (not flip-flops), and sometimes I wear heels. If, due to some unfortunate, unavoidable, unforeseen circumstance, I am not able to dress up for Mass, then I go with the "come as you are" principle (For that reason, I give people the benefit of the doubt. For all I know, they were out of town the night before, had car trouble, couldn't get home to change before Mass, and can't go to any of the other Masses because Great Aunt Ruth needs their help all day.).

In closing, here's an interesting video about what priests wear to Mass, what the vestments symbolize, and what priests pray when they vest. Enjoy!

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QxxYLmD8T_U&w=560&h=315]

Do you have any tips on Mass wardrobe? Is appropriate attire for weekday Mass different than Sunday Mass?



Wednesday, June 20, 2012

Modesty Matters: Humility


Sometimes it’s easy to get so focused on how leggings can’t replace pants and bikinis encourage lust that we forget why modesty matters. Following specific rules when getting dressed is great, but styles come and go, so I stick to principles that I can apply no matter what. I’d like to share some of those principles, beginning with (drum roll, please): Modesty is part of humility.
Conquering my desire to be desired is, for me, the most challenging aspect of practicing modesty and chastity. Wanting to be wanted is not bad: it helps us seek and find community, experience intimacy, and be drawn to the Lover of our souls, who desires us more than his own life. Only the divine can fulfill our desires. Everything else the world offers, even good things, leave us wanting more. Nothing finite satisfies us because we were created for eternal life. Therefore, all of our desires must be oriented towards holiness, or we’ll never actually be satisfied. Humility is seeing myself as God sees me; no more and no less.
Inextricably linked to confidence, humility flies in the face of “flaunt it if you’ve got it” as well as the lie that I am unworthy of love. A humble person knows that she is a wonderful reflection of Beauty himself and does not need to prove it by exposing her body. She knows that the gift of her sexuality is so precious, that the only person to receive her must first lay down his life before God and his Church, and she refuses to cheapen that gift or allow anyone else to preview it. She does not compete with others for attention because she is secure in who and whose she is. Want to be humble? Check out the Litany of Humility.
Prom Pick: I love bows, pink, and other girly things, so I love this dress from Delia's! If you have long legs, it might be too short, but their return policy is pretty good. $39.50
Challenge yourself. Ask why you want to wear that dress, tell that joke, discuss that topic, or buy those shorts. Is it to draw attention to your body? Turning heads is not bad—you’re beautiful!
But showing too much of your body can distract others from seeing the rest of what makes you wonderful: your smile, sense of humor, silly expressions, compassion, strength, etc. It is tempting to choose clothes that show off your body, but I urge you- overcome that temptation! Humility is dignifying, pleasing to God, and reveals your unique beauty in ways immodesty simply cannot.
“Charm is deceptive and beauty fleeting; the woman who fears the LORD is to be praised.” – Proverbs 31:30

Monday, May 14, 2012

Masturbation: What's the Big Deal?


As the Creator of sex, for which I think we’re all grateful, God knows the absolute best way to use it. When we choose to express our sexuality as it is intended to be expressed, tremendous graces and blessings enter the world.
Sex is the marital vows, translated into body language. My anatomy expresses the reality that I am someone’s gift. Sexuality is not meant to be self-serving. Sex is designed to be a complete, life-giving, faithful, free gift of self, and its purposes are the built-in results: babies and bonding.
Masturbation, however, turns sexuality in on itself. Masturbation is all about me: my pleasure, my desires, my loneliness, my stress, my sleepless nights, my gratification, my “whatever.” Masturbation is incompatible with love (doing what’s best for the other person), and that is why it’s a mortal sin. There is momentary pleasure, but no openness to life, no giving, and no receiving. It is a band-aid approach for whatever struggle the person hopes it will relieve him or her. What appears to be a remedy only brings shallow and temporary relief, but never healing.
In fact, it usually deepens the wound, especially because masturbation is so addictive. Addiction is an assault on freedom. Between fixes, an addict (to drugs, masturbation, cigarettes, pornography, alcohol, or anything) may feel stressed and on edge, consumed by her craving and anxiously seeking an opportunity to get the next fix. An addictive behavior limits a person’s ability to love, because she cannot give what she does not possess. Until she dominates her own desires, they enslave her.
If you are struggling with an addiction, talk to a counselor or priest who can help you overcome it. You are not a freak, a loser, or a lost cause. You are also not the only one who struggles with your addiction. God—who desires to free you from every entanglement so that you can experience true love, joy, peace, and happiness—loves you. God’s grace is bigger and stronger than masturbation and/or any other addiction we face.
 
 
Although I don’t struggle with the temptation to masturbate, it has burdened friends I love very much, both male and female. For added perspective, here are some other Catholics who are talking about this issue:
“Natural” by Steve Gershom
“Light of Hope” by Steve Gershom 
“Love Life Podcast – Not Quite Sex” by Matt Smith at Life Teen

Saturday, April 21, 2012

Oh, the humanity!



(HUNGER GAMES SPOILER ALERT. Skip to the  next paragraph.) During the tribute interviews leading up to the Quarter Quell, the audience in the Capitol is an emotional hot mess. The same spectators who have gleefully taken pleasure in 74 years of watching tributes murder one another are crying, fainting, and calling for change.


Invisible Children’s Kony 2012 video, posted to YouTube March 5, 2012, has garnered more than 86 million views and a passionate, albeit rash and emotionally driven*, response from many people (especially teens and young adults). As the video points out, technology enables us to see and connect with people all over the world, in ways we never previously could, and allows us to come face to face with people who had been “invisible” to us. Many are shocked by and distraught about the plight of child soldiers in Africa and, although they don’t know how, want to do something to save them.

 Trayvon Martin is a seventeen-year-old boy who was recently shot and killed. The case was under investigation for awhile, because law enforcement that acts first and thinks later is usually more dangerous than it is protective. However, the case elicited an interesting cultural reaction: people began donning hooded sweatshirts to rally one another to consider Trayvon to be “one of their own” and see from the perspective of Trayvon’s family members. Bloggers and reporters insist that if our children are not safe, no one is.

So, what do the Hunger Games, Kony2012, and Trayvon Martin have in common?  When people recognize someone’s humanity, they do not tolerate his murder.

Some folks argue that a baby isn’t a person until implantation, or until after 120 days, or until he/she can survive outside of the mother, or even until some time after birth, but scientific advances are making it harder and harder to deny that life begins at conception. That is why ultrasound technology is such a key player in the pro-life movement. An ultrasound reveals not a clump of tissue, but a little human being. Upon seeing her baby and hearing his or her little, beating heart, a mother’s anxiety is often overshadowed by awe, respect, protectiveness, compassion, or love.


Abortion ends the lives of three to four thousand little kids every single day in the USA, and that will continue for as long as we tell ourselves that they are not people. 

“I feel that the greatest destroyer of peace today is abortion, because it is a war against the child – a direct killing of the innocent child – murder by the mother herself. And if we accept that a mother can kill even her own child, how can we tell other people not to kill one another?” – Mother Teresa
*I am fully in favor of rescuing child soldiers, but for reasons I do not wish to get into here, I don’t think Kony2012 can accomplish that.


Saturday, April 14, 2012

This one's for you girls...


I've been asked so many times about what "guarding your heart" means, how you do this practically, especially if you're in a relationship that could lead to marriage, etc. etc.

And, although grad school and life just seems to have gotten in the way of me coherently gathering (and blogging...) my thoughts about this and many other things, it's a question that still catches my interest. Here's something to think about:


"Eventually I questioned the premise that 'to love' was equivalent to 'giving one's heart away.' . . . . We needn't be afraid. The flutterings of the heart that we experienced in that relationship that ended have taken away nothing. To give our hearts and our love to our husbands never meant to give him the sentiments that come with package but in the end are only incidental to True Love. Giving our hearts to our husbands means giving him a heart that is fully immersed in God's."

"Above all else guard your heart, for in it lies the wellspring of life." - Prov. 4:23